Archive for the ‘*Summit staff’ Category

Chairman of Assembly Higher Education Committee to hold news conference on campus


By Kellen Brauer

Marty Block
Marty Block

GROSSMONT COLLEGE- Marty Block, chairman of the Assembly committee on higher education, will be participating in a campus news conference at 11 a.m. Tuesday ,  Sept. 27,.

“A  panel of questioners will include Russ Lindquist, editor of the GC Summit; Marc Arizmendez, news director of Griffin Radio; and Sue Gonda, the president of the Academic Senate,” said the organizer,  Journalism Instructor Donald H. Harrison.  “He will be welcomed to the campus by both the Grossmont-Cuyamaca Community College District Chancellor Cindy Miles and Grossmont President Sunita Cooke.”

The first half hour of Block’s presentation will be questions from the panel while the second half will open up questioning to the floor.

Block, a Democrat representing San Diego, chairs the committee in the Assembly to which all legislation concerning colleges and universities is initially referred.  Before his election to the Legislature, he served for eight years as the chairman of the San Diego City College Board.   Prior to that he was a member of the San Diego County Board of Education.

“I will be asking questions that either I came up with or that the Jounalism class (MCOM 132) crafted together and decided,” said Lindquist. “I figure that I will get a whole lot of information from him that is useful for me but also useful for our readers.”

“I am going to be asking basic general questions,” said Arizmendez. “Hopefully I am going to get together with Russ and Mr. Harrison and come up with some good hard hitting questions.”

“I am looking forward to it [the conference] because the economy is shaky in general, so I look forward to getting some real practical advice from this legislator for the sake of making the right choices upcoming as I move onto a University,” said Lindquist.

Gonda was not immediately available for comment.

Arizmendez said the press conference will be a good way to present Grossmont College’s problems to Block, whose role is key to higher education in the state.

“Hopefully we get the answers that people want to hear,” said Arizmendez.

*
Brauer is a student in Media Comm 132.  He may be contacted at kellenb@gcsummit.com

Advertisements

In ‘Umoja’ — unity — is increased success in reaching academic goals

By Nicolle Fedor

GROSSMONT COLLEGE — The “Umoja” program on campus since 2006 has been reaching out to African and African-American students–and their friends from all other ethnic groups — to build a sense of community and connection to Grossmont College.

Funded by Grossmont College, “Umoja” — meaning “unity” in Swahili — is directed at helping community college students successfully transfer to four-year institutions to complete their studies, according to student ambassadors Cynthia Nelson and Katrina Piliaris.

The students said the free program was created to ““instill in our students the knowledge and skills necessary to enable them to make positive differences in their lives and the lives of others.”

Counselor James Canady and DSPS Instructor Patrice Braswell-Burris are advisers to Umoja.

Here is an excerpt of  a brief  audio interview with Nelson and Piliaris: Umoja-Fedor

*
Fedor is a student in the Media Communications Department.  She may be contacted at nicollef@gcsummit.com

National College Radio Day comes Oct. 11

By Nicolle Fedor

GROSSMONT COLLEGE –National College Radio Day will take place on campuses across North America on Tuesday, Oct. 11, in what organizer Rob Quicke says is an effort to “save and celebrate this valuable medium.”

The purpose of College Radio Day is to encourage those who have a passion for radio to “come together” and support the voice of the student, Quicke said. He explained that in response to the recession this past year, a number of FM radio stations at the national college level have been sold in an effort to raise funds.

Removing radio eliminates a huge platform for students to develop their skills and ultimately silences their creativity, Quicke said.

Within four weeks after Quicke announced the initiative on June 6, over 100 radio stations and the alternative rock band Coldplay have registered for this event, bringing the total to over 200 college and high school A.M. ,F.M. and On-Line stations, including Grossmont College’s Griffin Radio,

The radio stations will promote increased listenership and awareness in a special live broadcast feed between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m., Oct. 11, that will be heard in the Main Quad.

Here is the official College Radio Day promotional advertisement:  CollegeRadioDay-RockFormats!

*
Fedor is a student in Grossmont College’s media communications department

Griffins suffer heart-thumping football loss to Southwestern in first home game


Griffin Quarterback Mike Karls (13) successfully lands in the end zone for a 2-point conversion. (Photo: Dylan Burke)

By David Hurst

GROSSMONT COLLEGE—The Griffins outscored Southwestern College (SWC) 20-7 in the 4th quarter, but it was not enough as SWC escaped with a 40-37 football win at Mashin-Roth Stadium Saturday afternoon on the Grossmont campus. The team’s first home game of the 2011 season was witnessed by a capacity crowd that erupted after a 63 yard touchdown pass from Quarterback Chris Bonner to Wide Receiver Mervin Stewart only 45 seconds into the game.

The Griffins had a 17-7 lead at the end of the first quarter after a 29 yard field goal by Andres Carillo and a 1 yard run by Patrick Arinze that was set up by a 61 yard interception return by Eldredge Calhoun. SWC countered with 26 unanswered points and led 33-17 after 3 quarters. After an injury to Bonner sidelined him for the remainder of the game, backup Quarterback Mike Karls led the Griffins on a 3- play 78 yard drive that culminated in a spectacular 38 yard touchdown heave to Wide Receiver Joshua Bell. “I had to work hard for that catch; It helped our team out” said Bell. Karls then turned a broken play into a two point conversion by eluding two SWC defenders.

With the Griffins within a touchdown and a two point conversion of tying the game, Griffin defender Josh Canup intercepted a SWC pass and returned it 26 yards to the SWC 9 yard line. On the ensuing play Karls found Wide Receiver Tim Patrick for a 9 yard touchdown making the score 33-31. On the potential game tying 2 point conversion attempt, Karls’ pass fell incomplete and the Griffins were down by 2 points with 2:34 seconds remaining in the game.

Continue reading

Class offerings evolve in response to budget cuts, changing job market demands

By Issac Jeitler

GROSSMONT COLLEGE—This campus offers students a wide array of classes to choose from and a multitude of degrees. Even after having the amount of classes being offered cut by 8% from the 2010-2011 year, Grossmont still has an ample supply of opportunity for those seeking an education.

Sometimes scheduling conflicts can constrict a student’s opportunities. However, the counselling center on campus has staff on hand willing to help that student find options. If you’re an entering freshman this semester, official procedures favor you nexst semester: continuing students receive priority enrollment over those just entering the college as freshmen.

Grossmont has a diverse range of academic programs, old and new. Dr. Barbara Blanchard, vice president of Academic Affairs, commented in an interview that, “demand in programs changes.” She said some degrees currently have no job market availability, so are now being deemphasized, while other degree programs in the future may be for occupations not currently served by the college.

She added that “Grossmont College is one of four California community colleges working on a trial program that will offer Bachelor degrees to Nursing students.”

“Even after the cuts to classes, Grossmont College still has a good breadth of offerings, passionate faculty and has great educational goals,” Blanchard said. Notwithstanding budget and class cuts, “the success rate of students is approximately 71% for students transferring or completing their educational goal.”

*
Jeitler is a student in Media Comm 132. He may be contacted at issacj@gcsummit.com

Transfer Center planning Oct. 5 College Transfer Day

By David Hurst

GROSSMONT COLLEGE—While Grossmont College is a fine institution of higher learning, for many students on campus it is a stepping stone to a four-year university. This is where the Transfer Center in 58-D comes into play.

October will be a big month for students looking to transfer to other Universities. Wednesday, October 5, will be College Transfer Day in the main quad of the Grossmont Campus. There will be over 40 colleges and universities represented. “It is important for students to take advantage of this opportunity,” says Transfer Specialist Diane Sandoval. The day will give the students a chance to familiarize themselves with these colleges and universities.

Sandoval also encourages students to visit the website http://www.grossmont.edu/transfercenter/ to view other upcoming events. “I wish students would really look at this,” she said.

The website features scheduled work shops at which students can get personal attention from Mary Rider, coordinator of the Transfer Center.

*
Hurst is a student in Media Commm 132. He may be contacted at davidh@gcsummit.com

Campus DSPS office provides a variety of services for students with disabilities


By Issac Jeitler

GROSSMONT COLLEGE – The campus Disabled Student Programs and Services, or DSPS, department offers ample amounts of help for students with disabilities.

According to Glenda Wycoff, a Student Services Specialist in the DSPS office, any student can apply anytime throughout the year “with verification of disability from a licensed practitioner.” It is not mandatory for students to apply to DSPS, but it is highly recommended for students who could use help to at least stop by the office in room 58K of the modular village, she said.

Among services offered by the department are adapted exercise science courses such as swim or yoga. These classes are based around each students disability. DSPS also offers locker storage for students who cannot carry their bags and books all over campus. Other services offered may include audio books, priority registration dates, special seating and the service most used by students, extra test time.

Wycoff recommends that students with disabilities stop by the DSPS office if they have any questions about these and other services intended to help them reach their educational goals.

*
Jeitler is a student in Media Commm 132. He may be reacted at issacj@gcsummit.com